necrology (countable and uncountable, plural necrologies) (church historical) A church register containing the names of those connected with the church who have died. (1918). 1706, "register of deaths, a list of the dead," from Medieval Latin obituarius "a record of the death of a person," literally "pertaining to death," from Latin obitus "departure, a going to meet, encounter" (a euphemism for "death"), from stem of obire "go toward, go to meet" (as in mortem obire "meet death"), from ob "toward" (see ob-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). The 1768 Dictionnaire Royal François-Anglois Et Anglois-François defines French morgue both as "A proud, big, haughty or stately look, stare, surliness, or surly look" and "A little gratel room wherein a new prisoner is set, and must continue some hours, that the Jailer's ordinary servants may the better take notice of his face.". As an adjective, "relating to or recording a death," from 1828. A similar euphemism is in Old English cognate forðfaran "to die," literally "to go forth;" utsið "death," literally "going out, departure. Originally of those connected with a certain institution; by 1854 in reference to persons who died within a certain time. In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.

Meaning "a record or announcement of a death," especially in a newspaper, and including a brief biographical sketch, is from 1738. Fast forward to the founding of early America, and the obituary hasn’… History and Etymology for necrology. From Medieval Latin obituarius, from Latin obitus (“a going to a place, approach, usually a going down, setting (as of the sun), fall, ruin, death”), from obire (“to go or come to, usually go down, set, fall, perish, die”), from ob (“toward, to”) + ire (“to go”). … Meaning "a record or announcement of a death," especially in a newspaper, and including a brief biographical sketch, is from 1738. Dictionnaire Royal François-Anglois Et Anglois-François. Originally of those connected with a certain institution; by 1854 in reference to persons who died within a certain time. Hebrew: מוֹדַעַת אֵבֶל ‎ (he) f ( moda'át evel) Hungarian: gyászjelentés (hu) Icelandic: minning (is) Ido: nekrologo (io) Indonesian: berita duka (id), kabar duka (id) Irish: scéala báis m. Japanese: 死亡記事 ( しぼうきじ, shibō kiji) Lithuanian: nekrologas (lt) m. Norwegian: nekrolog (no) m, dødsannonse m. Related: Necrologic; necrological; necrologist.

earlier, "register of ecclesiastical deaths, death roll," borrowed from New Latin necrologium, from necro-necro-+ -logium (as in Medieval Latin eulogium eulogy)

Related: Necrologic; necrological; necrologist. necrology (n.) "register of deaths, obituary notices," 1705, from necro- "death" + -logy. As an adjective, "relating to or recording a death," from 1828. a list of persons who have died within a certain time. "statement in passing," a judge's expression of opinion not regarded as binding or decisive, Latin, literally "something said incidentally;" from obiter "by the way" + dictum in the legal sense "a judge's expression of opinion which is not the formal resolution of a case or determination of the court.". Thus the name is believed to be probably from French morgue "haughtiness, pride," originally "a sad expression, solemn look," from Old French morguer "look solemnly," from Vulgar Latin *murricare "to make a face, pout," from *murrum "muzzle, snout." Latin obiter is from ob "in front of, toward" (see ob-) + iter "journey" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). ". Pronunciation IPA : /nɛˈkɹɒlədʒi/ Noun . necrology (n.) "register of deaths, obituary notices," 1705, from necro- "death" + -logy. From necro-+‎ -logy. "the recorder of a death; a writer of obituaries," 1792, from obituary + -ist. necrology "register of deaths, obituary notices," 1705, from necro- "death" + -logy . gies. Adopted 1880s as a general term in U.S., replacing earlier dead house, etc.

It can mean “going down, or setting (like a sunset).” Which is a bit more poeticthan its other translation of “fall, ruin, and death.” The earliest form of obituaries — like so many things — can be traced back to early Rome.
In Latin, obit translates to a few things. As an adjective, "relating to or recording a death," from 1828. The Acta Diurna, or “Daily Acts” was a daily papyrus newsletter distributed to the public. Klein's sources, however, say it is ob with the suffix -iter on analogy of circiter "about" from circa. The newsletter included all sorts of happenings of the day, including prominent death announcements. From c. 1400 as "anniversary of a person's death; memorial service held on the anniversary of a person's death." A similar euphemism is in Old English cognate forðfaran "to die," literally "to go forth;" utsið "death," literally "going out, departure.". Etymology . with date is from Latin obiit "(he) died," third person singular of obire. late 14c., "death," a sense now obsolete, from Old French obit or directly from Medieval Latin obitus "death" (a figurative use, literally "a going down, a going to a place"), noun use of past participle of Latin obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). Originally of those connected with a certain institution; by 1854 in reference to persons who died within a certain time. Related: Necrologic; necrological; necrologist. The scholarly abbreviation ob. This page was last edited on 24 October 2020, at 03:08.

A listing of people who have died during a specific period of time.
"a writer of obituary notices," 1808, from necro- "death" + ending as in biographer, etc.

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, brief notice of a person's death, as published in a newspaper, a going to a place, approach, usually a going down, setting (as of the sun), fall, ruin, death, to go or come to, usually go down, set, fall, perish, die, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=obituary&oldid=60922068, English terms derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₁ey-, English terms derived from Medieval Latin, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. "register of deaths, obituary notices," 1705, from necro- "death" + -logy. In newspaper slang, "collection of pre-written obituary material of living persons" (1898), thence extended generally to "library of clips, photos, etc." Originally of those connected with a certain institution; by 1854 in reference to persons who died within a certain time. a notice of death; obituary. "mortuary, place where bodies of persons found dead are taken to be claimed by family or friends," 1821, from French Morgue, originally a specific building in Paris where bodies were exposed for identification: Before that it was the place where new prisoners were displayed to keepers to establish their identification.

Also see obituary. Related entries & more. borrowed from New Latin obituārium, noun derivative of Medieval Latin obituārius "of death, recording records or dates of death," from Latin obitu-, stem of obitus "death" + -ārius -ary entry 2 — more at obit. 1706, "register of deaths, a list of the dead," from Medieval Latin obituarius "a record of the death of a person," literally "pertaining to death," from Latin obitus "departure, a going to meet, encounter" (a euphemism for "death"), from stem of obire "go toward, go to meet" (as in mortem obire "meet death"), from ob "toward" (see ob-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").


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